AESE insight

AESE insight

AESE insight > Thinking Ahead

AESE insight #17

1 de outubro 2020

Xavier Vives

Professor of Economics and Financial Management at IESE Business School
Abertis Chair of Regulation, Competition and Public Policy

Since the introduction of the single currency, the industrial share of the economy in terms of value added has remained stable in Germany while declining markedly in France, Spain, and Italy. Germany’s massive economic-policy response to the COVID-19 shock is bound to reinforce this tendency.


Industry, broadly construed to include digital services, is the key to increasing productivity, implying that the European Union’s southern members will need to embark upon an industrial revival. Otherwise, their relative lack of competitiveness will deepen imbalances within the eurozone, and raise the prospect of permanent north-to-south transfers, threatening the bloc’s political sustainability

A Stable Euro Requires an Ambitious Industrial Policy

After years of falling behind in cutting-edge technologies, Europe now has a chance to transform its economy in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. The case for an EU-level industrial policy is stronger than ever, and the survival of the eurozone itself may depend on it.


BARCELONA – The idea of a European industrial policy has been back on the agenda at least since the release of a Franco-German manifesto on the issue in early 2019. But whereas that document focused primarily on global competitiveness, an equally strong argument for reviving industrial policy is that it is necessary for the survival of the euro.


Since the introduction of the single currency, the industrial share of the economy in terms of value added has remained stable in Germany while declining markedly in France, Spain, and Italy. Germany’s massive economic-policy response to the COVID-19 shock is bound to reinforce this tendency.


Industry, broadly construed to include digital services, is the key to increasing productivity, implying that the European Union’s southern members will need to embark upon an industrial revival. Otherwise, their relative lack of competitiveness will deepen imbalances within the eurozone, and raise the prospect of permanent north-to-south transfers, threatening the bloc’s political sustainability.


The bad news is that while France can perhaps afford to spend billions of euros supporting its auto industry, Italy and Spain cannot. The good news is that the recently adopted Next Generation EU recovery package offers an opportunity both to revive southern European industry and position it for a digital, sustainable future.


According to the European Council’s agreement this past July, “Member States shall prepare national recovery and resilience plans setting out the reform and investment agenda of the Member State concerned for the years 2021-23.” But EU leaders should now go further, by establishing clear goals for making European industry not just globally competitive but also more geographically balanced. The focus should be on the same key sectors identified in the Franco-German manifesto: health, energy, climate, security, and digital technology, with specific initiatives in microelectronics, batteries, and artificial intelligence (AI).


While the United States and China each race ahead in pursuit of global dominance in AI and other cutting-edge technologies, Europe is increasingly lagging behind in the digital economy. Even in successful Germany, total stock-market capitalization is less than that of a single US tech giant like Amazon, Apple, or Microsoft.


Contrary to what some commentators have argued, Europe’s lack of technological competitiveness is not the result of EU competition policy, which has blocked such mergers as the one between Alstom and Siemens. Rather, Europe’s problem is that it has a deeply fragmented digital market, which makes it impossible for firms to profit from the dynamic economies of scale that digital platforms and Big Data would otherwise offer. This obstacle leaves few incentives to invest in the research and development that drives innovation.


Making matters worse, Europe also has deeply fragmented public procurement policies, owing largely to the fact that it lacks a joint defense policy. It is this fragmentation, not competition within the single market, that explains the absence of European “champions.”


In the past, European industrial policy decayed after the strategy of picking winners failed in the 1980s and 1990s. Policymakers shifted their focus to fostering innovation, training the workforce, and providing an attractive business environment. Then, the 2008 global financial crisis renewed interest in industrial policy, and now the COVID-19 pandemic has underscored its potential advantages as a means of driving competition, advancing sustainability objectives, securing supply chains, and increasing economic resilience.


The pandemic has made technological sovereignty and value-chain stability leading priorities, not just in Europe but everywhere. Both imperatives feature prominently in US Democratic presidential contender Joe Biden’s economic-policy platform, and there is every reason to believe that the operations of foreign state-controlled firms – particularly Chinese companies – will be closely monitored both in the US and in Europe in the years ahead.


Moreover, industrial policy has a crucial role to play in moving resources from declining and obsolete sectors to emerging, viable ones. Without a strategic approach, state aid to the private sector will merely create more zombie firms that should have failed. This danger is particularly acute in the current circumstances, given the scale of emergency spending by governments. In pursuing a post-pandemic recovery, the goal of Next Generation EU and other programs should be not just to restore growth but also to transform the economy.


To that end, industrial policies should be used to help coordinate investments. Key industries like electric vehicles depend not just on the automotive sector but also on domains ranging from AI and 5G to battery manufacturing and infrastructure (charging stations). Achieving global competitiveness in this industry thus requires wide-ranging complementary investments, not to mention a properly trained and educated workforce. In Europe’s case, a traditional laissez-faire approach will have little to recommend it. Public-private cooperation will be necessary.


The success of the EU recovery fund depends on coordination at the European level, following a process of careful selection and monitoring of public spending. To prevent pork barrel politics from limiting the transformational potential of the recovery, candidate projects should be evaluated and shaped by independent national agencies staffed by recognized professionals.


The eurozone needs an industrial policy that preserves internal competition while also bolstering southern European industry and upholding the EU’s commitment to open markets internationally. Otherwise, the euro itself will remain at risk.

More information about Project Syndicate  

World Economic Forum

Digital Transformation: Powering the Great Reset

Since the introduction of the single currency, the industrial share of the economy in terms of value added has remained stable in Germany while declining markedly in France, Spain, and Italy. Germany’s massive economic-policy response to the COVID-19 shock is bound to reinforce this tendency.


Industry, broadly construed to include digital services, is the key to increasing productivity, implying that the European Union’s southern members will need to embark upon an industrial revival. Otherwise, their relative lack of competitiveness will deepen imbalances within the eurozone, and raise the prospect of permanent north-to-south transfers, threatening the bloc’s political sustainability

COVID-19 has irrevocably changed our world

World Economic Forum


COVID-19 is a watershed moment for the digital transformation of business. The rules for success have changed and are ever more reliant on harnessing the power of digital models to create new value and experiences. Accelerating digital transformation, with purpose, is essential for companies to survive and thrive in the new normal. Successful leaders will now seize the opportunity to advance a new trajectory for digital transformation that aligns with the changing role of business: to be a powerful enabler of long-term value creation for all its stakeholders.


This paper offers an opening frame for a multiyear, cross-industry programme to co-create the new playbooks for executive decision-making and action in a post-pandemic business normal. It presents three opportunities for digitally enabled corporate leadership to support the Great Reset of our economies and societies.


Download pdf 

Sessão Alumni Learning Program

O Burnout em Portugal com o Prof. António Sampaio

Veja ou reveja a sessão de 21 de setembro do Alumni Learning Program dedicada ao tema “Burnout em Portugal: controlar os fatores de risco” com o Psiquiatra, Professor e Escritor, António Sampaio.


O Burnout e a Pós Modernidade, o Trabalho e a Prevenção foram os grandes temas em debate.

Burnout em Portugal: controlar os fatores de risco

O Burnout e a Pós Modernidade
De acordo com a OMS, o orador começou por definir Burnout como um fenómeno que evoluiu na pos modernidade, com o primado socio-cultural da produtividade, ficando o conhecimento e o discurso político refens dos constrangimentos económicos.


António Sampaio considera que atualmente, dada a diversidade de opiniões vinculadas pelos media “o homem adere ao discurso da rede com o qual mais se identifica”, sem refletir. A maioria passa a ter o poder de estipular o certo e o errado, manipulando a investigação científica com fito à validação, em deterimento do conhecimento per si.


Na verdade, a Tecnologia progrediu com a pos modernidade sendo que o conhecimento não acompanhou esta evolução. O excesso de informação e o individualismo contribuiram para uma quebra da coesão social.


Burnout e o Trabalho
O Burnout tem a sua origem “intimamente ligada à vida profissional”, sendo que o stress nas relações laborais se sobrepõe ao sofrimento derivado a perdas afetivas. A autoestima passa a ser medida pelo sucesso profissional, manifestação à qual se alia a dedicação intensificada à atividade profissional, o descurar das necessidades pessoais, como as refeições, as horas de sono e o lazer…


Este comportamento conduz frequentemente a estados de Depressão, que se evidenciam através da indiferença, da desesperança e da exaustão, levando progressivamente ao colapso físico e mental.


A confusão entre a identidade e a vida profissional estabelecem como critério de avaliação o grau de utilidade da pessoa. Em caso de Burnout, a perceção de inutilidade gera amiúde a perda do propósito da vida.


O psiquiatra António Sampaio apresentou dados preocupantes que retratam a questão o Burnout em Portugal. Em 2017, esta perturbação no estado de saúde afetava “17,2% da população ativa” no País. “Um estudo nacional sobre o “Burnout na classe médica”, divulgado em 2016, revelou que dois terços dos médicos portugueses estão em elevado nível de exaustão emocional, uma das dimensões da síndrome de burnout.” E toca à Geração Millennial ( nascida após 1985) ser o alvo mais mais exposto ao problema do Burnout, face à “relação com a pós-modernidade”.


No contexto europeu, Portugal distingue-se por apresentar os valores mais elevados no que toca a perturbações de ansiedade e depressão. O insucesso profissional e a depressão tendem a produzir um maior isolamento social, diminuição das capacidades cognitivas e agravamento do mal estar.


Prevenção do Burnout
António Sampaio apontou algumas medidas profiláticas face ao Burnout, como “o conhecimento do Homem e das suas características inerentes, tendo em conta a Sociabilidade, a Cognição (conhecimento / criatividade), as práticas de atividade física essenciais e o ritmo sono/vigilia.”


Destacou “o auto-conhecimento dos seus limites, das suas aptidões e características de personalidade”.


“Os projetos existenciais como o famíliar, o social em áreas não ligadas ao trabalho) e laboral”, que se reflita a nível do desenho da carreira, com objetivos realistas) também têm uma dimensão muito importante na prevenção de esgotamento.


O orador alertou ainda para o dever que temos de cuidar das “características de contexto de modo a poder-se “obviar” o “contra-natura” no sentido da vida “artificial” e fora da natureza do Homem.”


No dia a dia, há boas práticas a cuidar como a promoção do diálogo, o desligamento da tecnologia fora do trabalho, a promoção da participação nas decisões e a clarificação das funções de cada trabalhador. A par destas medidas a DGERT – Direção Geral do Emprego e das relações de trabalho lançou o Programa para a conciliação da Vida Profissional, Pessoal e Familiar com o propósito de favorecer a flexibilidade dos horários e o teletrabalho; a implementação de acordos favoráveis à vida extra-laboral, a nível de cantinas, creches e atividade física; e ainda a garantia de oportunidades de formação e de progressão na carreira.

Jaime Francisco Quesado

Economista e Gestor
Alumnus do 43º PADE

A renovação do Compromisso Digital não pode ser feita por decreto. Implica uma ampla mobilização de todos para um percurso conjunto em que teremos que ser capazes de encontrar respostas para questões que serão fundamentais para a construção deste novo tempo que aí vem:

Qual o caminho a dar às TIC enquanto instrumentos centrais duma política activa de intervenção pública como matriz

Compromisso Digital

Este período complexo e incerto que estamos a viver levanta muitas questões em relação ao futuro.  Um futuro onde o digital vai claramente ter um novo papel a desempenhar. O Digital será um enabler de modernidade operativa, mas sobretudo uma fronteira positiva entre a aposta na inovação e a realização dum desejado equilíbrio social. No tempo que aí vem, o digital passará a estar presente cada vez mais no nosso dia a dia, ajudando a economia  a ser confrontada com uma agenda de valor cada vez mais competitiva e global e a sociedade com a necessidade de fazer um compromisso permanente entre o acesso a uma informação sempre disponível e a preservação dum espaço privado sempre importante. Precisamos por isso neste tempo de crise de renovar o nosso Compromisso Digital.


A consolidação de um verdadeiro Compromisso Digital é um desafio complexo e transversal a todos os actores e exige um capital de colaboração entre todos. Com o Digital a nossa sociedade será cada vez mais diferente e o grau de liberdade de participação das pessoas passará a ter uma dimensão nunca antes possível – a informação passará a estar disponível a todo o momento e a ser a base de novas plataformas de inteligência estratégica, dinamizadoras de novas redes de colaboração e de novas soluções para os novos problemas que surgiram. O Compromisso Digital irá acelerar a capacidade e ritmo de execução num contexto de competência cada vez mais exigente.


A renovação do Compromisso Digital não pode ser feita por decreto. Implica uma ampla mobilização de todos para um percurso conjunto em que teremos que ser capazes de encontrar respostas para questões que serão fundamentais para a construção deste novo tempo que aí vem:

  • Qual o caminho a dar às TIC enquanto instrumentos centrais duma política activa de intervenção pública como matriz transversal da renovação da nossa sociedade?
  • Qual a forma possível de fazer das empresas (e em particular das PME) os actores relevantes na criação e valor e garantia de padrões de qualidade e vida social adequados, num cenário de crescente “deslocalização” económica?
  • Qual o papel efectivo da educação como quadro referencial essencial da adequação dos actores sociais aos novos desafios da sociedade do conhecimento? Os actores do conhecimento de que tanto se precisa são “educados” ou “formados”?
  • Qual o papel do I&D enquanto área capaz de fazer o compromisso necessário entre a urgência da ciência e a inevitabilidade da sua mais do que necessária aplicabilidade prática para efeitos de indução duma cultura estruturada de inovação?
  • Qual o sentido efectivo das políticas de empregabilidade e inclusão social enquanto instrumentos de promoção dum objetivo global de coesão social? O que fazer de todos os que pelo desemprego se sentem cada vez mais marginalizados pelo sistema?


Neste tempo de pandemia temos que fazer do digital um elemento de integração e de partilha inteligente. O Estado voltou a ser chamado a uma missão estratégica de ajudar a sociedade e a economia a recuperar desta crise e o digital terá que duma vez por todas  ser a marca de eficiência e de confiança na sua relação com os cidadãos e as empresas para protagonizar essa agenda comum – não será um percurso que se fará por decreto mas sim através de redes de colaboração inteligentes construídas e renovadas em cada dia. Teremos assim a base para que as empresas assumam o digital como um fator adicional na renovação das suas cadeias de valor e na abordagem de mercados mais exigentes e mais complexos, e a educação e a investigação científica poderão adaptar-se aos novos requisitos de inteligência competitiva que este novo tempo vai exigir. Porque de facto este será um tempo em que o compromisso – através do digital – passará muito por ser dado às pessoas a oportunidade de participarem de forma ativa – através do seu emprego e de outras ações – no reforço da competência e da modernidade das suas comunidades e na criação de um bem-estar coletivo sustentável.


O Compromisso Digital terá que assentar na criação das condições para a qualificação “em rede” dos diferentes agentes que acreditam no futuro e numa verdadeira “agenda de modernidade”, participativa e apostada novo paradigma da competitividade, essencial para a criação duma oportunidade nacional na economia global. Com o Compromisso Digital será a oportunidade da informação se assumir duma vez por todas como a base de uma nova inteligência estratégica que mobilize a sociedade para um novo contrato colectivo de confiança, em que a autonomia individual se assuma como a base de uma nova diferença. É esta a aposta na renovação do Compromisso Digital.